Яндекс.Метрика
   
   


The Red Army, Russian Tanks, German Tanks

03-04-2013

Tiger I Tank

Production of the Henschel vehicle began in mid-1942. The new heavy tank was originally designated the Panzer VI Tiger Ausf H1 in March 1942. In March 1943 the German tanksArmy changed the designation from Tiger H1 to the much more familiar Tiger I. The Ausf designation was also changed from the original Ausf H1 to Ausf E. By this time, combat-loaded gross vehicle weight had increased to 57 tons from the original 45-ton design weight. This added weight imposed severe mobility and reliability penalties. For example, long forced marches were forbidden since they placed undue strain on the engine, transmission, and suspension systems. German Tanks

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29-03-2013

Heavy Tank Elefant

Between 1937 and early 1941, the German firm of Henschel, under sponsorship by the German army ordnance department, undertook a series of experimental projects that focused on a viable medium tank design. This work resulted in the building and testing of a number of prototype vehicles. While none of these prototypes were considered for production, the effort gave Henschel valuable engineering experience in the design considerations for heavy tanks.

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26-03-2013

Panther Tanks

Starting in February 1944 the Germans began production of a new Jagdpanzer known as the Jagdpanther (Hunting Panther) based on the Ausf G version of the Panther chassis. The vehicle was armed with a limited-traverse 88-mm gun and a single hull-mounted 7.92-mm machine gun. German industry built 392 of these vehicles between January 1944 and March 1945. German Tanks

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24-03-2013

German Panther Tank

One has to wonder how the Panther, which was first produced in late 1942, could prove so superior to American tanks and most tank destroyers as late as 1945. Part of the answer lies in the fact that the Panther design was based on German experience fighting on the eastern front, where large and frequent tank battles had been raging for years. The gun-armor race between German and Soviet tank designers had been conducted at a feverish pace since early 1942. It resulted in the progressive advent of tanks with thicker armor and ever larger and more powerful guns. German Tanks

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21-03-2013

StuG III, Panzer V, German Tank

The biggest surprise for the U.S. Army after the June 6, 1944, invasion of France (D-Day) was encountering the German Panzer V medium tank. American tank crews who faced it in battle feared the Panzer V as a formidable and deadly adversary. Sergeant Rains M. Robbins, an American M-4 Sherman medium tank commander, and his driver Corporal Walter McGrail described their first impressions of the Panzer V in a wartime report German Tanks

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